marc17 (marc17) wrote,
marc17
marc17

Monday in Rome

Monday was my first day in Rome and I took off over the path I had travelled the previous night as it was now daytime and not raining. After seeing the Colosseum, forum, Vittorio, Trevi fountain yet again, I decided I'd probably take the subway from now on and skip that two miles of sightseeing (although I'd end up seeing them all several more times).





Here is the Palatine Hill in the background with the remains of the palace of Augustus sitting above the remains of the Roman forum.



Past the forum and right behind the Vittorio is the Capitoline Hill (where we get the word Capitol from). This is the Capitoline Wolf, the 5th century BC statue of the wolf suckling Romulus and Remus (probably a replica I think).



The Spanish steps. Followed by the Mausoleum of Augustus. The mausoleum was blocked off for restoration without even a good view point to look at it from afar. It was my first encounter with the Cats of Rome however. I was wandering by right around taking this photo and ended up face to face with a kitten so young it couldn't sit up without wobbling on a pile of construction equipment. I figured the workmen put it there but as I looked back just down the sidewalk, I saw the momma cat looking around the corner from where it was back at me. There are all sorts of cats in Rome, especially the ruins. Unlike most ferals, they seem fairly familiar with people and just lounge on ancient ruins. There is even a calendar that I really should have gotten showing this.



Rome also likes its Egyptian obelisks, most brought over from Egypt in the time of the Caesers. Many of the important plazas have one, including that of the Vatican.



The thing about Rome and motor scooters is not wrong. They're everywhere. At one point I ended up taking a wrong turn and ended up someplace called the Road of Four Fountains (which was an intersection that had a fountain at each corner) during rush hour. Business men on scooters everywhere.



Last but not least is the Roman Pantheon which has been called the most influential building in the architecture of Western Civilization. The ancient Roman panthoen later given to the Catholic church and still standing. Now brick with bits of its former marble cladding and ancient columns that seem to stand like ancient dead trees. The inside is from before interior lighting and has an oculus that lets sun and rain in and has for almost 2000 years. I wanted to go back and see it inside while it was raining, but the chance never happened. It was certainly impressive.

Rest of the photos from Monday.
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic
  • 3 comments
These are amazing. I've read so much about Rome but never been there. It's incredible to see such a personal view of these legendary places.
It was a bit daunting to stand next to something and realize that it had literally been standing there for almost two thousand years.
Thanks for sharing these beautiful pictures!